認知症になりながらも、前向きな道を見つけたウェンディ・ミッチェル「始まりのお話」

by Wendy Mitchell | The Guardian
5点中4.20165点の評価 243

It was at work where I noticed my first symptoms. I was a non-clinical team leader training matrons and sisters in the art of electronic rostering. My girls called me a workaholic. My brilliant memory, the thing I relied on most, started letting me down badly. I knew somehow that things were not right, but when I finally went to the doctors it took a long time to get the diagnosis. Initially my symptoms were dismissed as age or stress related (I was 58), but I was persistent and knew how the system worked. When I finally received the diagnosis, in 2014, it was devastating but it was also, bizarrely, a relief. It finally put an end to all the uncertainties which meant I could now start planning my life with this new, unexpected label attached.

私が初めて症状に気づいたのは職場でした。私はNHS(英国国民保健サービス)に勤めており、非臨床チームのリーダーとして、同僚たちに電子勤務表のトレーニングを行っていました。そんな私を娘たちは仕事中毒と呼んでいました。しかし、仕事人間な私が最も頼りにしていた記憶力が、曖昧になり、私を裏切るようになったのです。

何かがおかしいことはわかっていましたが、最終的に医師の診察を受けても、正しい診断結果を得るまでには時間がかかりました。

当初、私の症状は、58歳という年齢かストレスのせいだと片付けられました。けれど私はそうは思いませんでした。なぜなら自分の体がどのような仕組みかを知っていたからです。2014年にようやく正しい診断結果を知らされた時は大きなショックを受けましたが、奇妙なことに安堵もしました。ついにすべてが明らかになり、「認知症」という予想外の新しいラベルが付いた人生の計画を立てられるようになったのです。

I was determined to choose a positive path. The very nature of my diagnosis signalled the loss of the old me – my memories, my tastes, my abilities, my plans I took for granted – but, more importantly, it signalled the birth of the new me, a new chance. Many find it hard to believe, but I feel I’ve gained more than I’ve lost.

私は前向きな道を歩むことに決めました。私が受けた診断結果は、これまでの私が失われていく可能性があることを意味していました。しかし、もっと重要なことは、新しい私や新しいチャンスが生まれることです。多くの人は信じられないようですが、私は失ったものよりも得たものの方が多いと感じています。

I face life with dementia head-on, as though I’m playing a game of chess, waiting for my opponent to make their move, then trying to outmanoeuvre and outwit them. I now own a cat, Billy, which would never have been possible before dementia entered my world, because I used to be terrified of animals. I would cross the road if a cat appeared within 100 yards of me. Not now. Billy is my soul mate. I see him and I instantly feel happy and calm. Now Billy and I often sit and simply stare out over the orchard beyond, watching the birds and enjoying the silence.

私は認知症と正面から向き合うことになりました。まるでチェスをするかのように、相手の動きを待ち、裏をかかなければなりません。私は今、ビリーという名前の猫を飼っています。猫を飼うなんて、認知症になるまではあり得ないことでした。以前の私は動物を恐れていたためです。100m以内に猫が現れたら、遠ざかるために道路を渡っていたほどです。

しかし、今は違います。ビリーは私の親友です。ビリーに会うと幸せで穏やかな気持ちになります。しばしば、ビリーと私は一緒に座り、遠くの果樹園を眺めながら過ごします。鳥たちを観察し、静寂を楽しみます。

So many wonderful opportunities have come my way since I’ve been diagnosed. I refer to them as “the advantages of dementia”. When I explain this to people, they may think I’ve totally lost the plot, but keeping in mind the positives that come out of this kind of diagnosis helps me cope.

認知症と診断されてから、いくつもの素晴らしいチャンスがやって来ています。私はこれを「認知症のメリット」と呼んでいます。こう説明すると、私のことをおかしいと思うかもしれませんが、このような診断結果を受けた後に良い部分を意識しておくことが私の助けになっています。

I’m part of many committees and research groups, because that’s how I believe I can influence change. I talk all over the country in many different settings. I call all this my sudoku, exposing my brain to different conversations in different environments.

私はいくつもの委員会や研究グループに参加しています。そうすれば自らの体調の変化に影響を与えることができると信じているからです。英国のさまざまな場所で話をしています。私にとって、こうした機会は数独パズルのようなものです。自分の脳を異なる環境や異なる会話にさらしているのです。

Shocked at the lack of awareness, I now shout from the rooftops

認知症に対する認識不足にショックを受け、声をあげることを決意

But it’s not easy. People think I magically appear at events, unaware of the effort and planning that goes into getting anywhere. But I’m not going to stay at home hiding from life, giving into deterioration. The hours I’ve spent checking routes, printing instructions to follow, walking maps – both there and in reverse to get back to the station – the photos of venues and people so I recognise them when I get there and then, of course, the inevitable Plan Bs in case it all goes wrong. All my planning and safety precautions I keep stored in my pink file that goes with me everywhere. Before my diagnosis, I was renowned for being highly organised and that skill has certainly become my life-saver.

しかし、これは簡単なことではありません。イベントに参加した人々は、私が魔法のようにその場に現れたと思うようですが、実際にはどこへ行くにも努力と計画が必要です。それでも、私は自宅にこもって人生に背を向け、衰えに屈するつもりはありません。私は何時間もかけて道順をチェックし、従うべき指示、目的地と駅の間の往復の地図、会場とそこにいる人々を認識するための写真、そしてもちろん、何もかもに失敗した場合の代替案を印刷します。

計画や安全対策は、すべてピンクのファイルに入れて肌身離さず持ち歩きます。診断前、私はとても几帳面なことで知られていました。間違いなく、その能力が今、大きな助けになっています。

So many things have come my way since my diagnosis and I think it’s because it’s so rare to meet someone with the disease who is willing and able to talk about it. People are curious about what goes on inside me. Julianne Moore invited me to have a cup of tea before the premier of Still Alice (the film about a woman who develops early onset Alzheimer’s), which was surreal. Then I was a consultant for the cast of the UK premier of the stage version. I remember saying to Sharon Small, who played the lead, to remember that Alice is not ageing, she’s cognitively declining. This enabled her to think differently about her role: how she moved about the stage and paused for a minute to think before speaking. I made a short film for the BBC about living with dementia that has now been seen all over the world. Last year we made an updated film about how we all are three years on.

診断を受けて以来、本当にいろいろな体験をしています。なぜなら自分の認知症について語りたがる人や、語ることのできる人がほとんどいないからだと思います。私の中で何が起きているのか、みんな知りたがっています。若年性アルツハイマー病を発症した女性を描いた映画『アリスのままで』の上映前に、主演女優のジュリアン・ムーアは私をお茶に誘ってくれました。夢のようなひとときでした。

この映画は舞台化され、私は英国版キャストのコンサルタントを務めました。主役のシャロン・スモールに、アリスは老化しているのではなく、認知機能が低下しているのだと伝えたことを覚えています。この言葉をきっかけに、スモールは自分の役に対する考え方を変えました。舞台での動き方が変わり、しばらく考えてから話すようになりました。

認知症と生きることをテーマにしたBBC(英国の放送局)の短編映画も制作しました。2018年には、3年後の私たちを紹介する続編も制作しました。

None of these wonderful opportunities would have entered the radar of the very private me pre-diagnosis – I’m not sure I would have had the courage and I certainly didn’t have a cause. But after I was diagnosed, I became so shocked at the lack of awareness from both the public and clinicians that I now shout from the rooftops. I’ve become a new person, more brave and socially minded than I ever was before, and the gifts these newfound characteristics have brought me are immense.

診断前の私はとても引っ込み思案で、このような素晴らしいチャンスとは無縁でした。このような体験をする勇気があったかどうかわかりませんし、もちろん、このような体験をする理由もありませんでした。しかし診断後、一般市民と臨床医の両方の認識不足にショックを受けた私は、声をあげようと決意しました。私はかつてないほど勇敢で、社会問題への関心が高い、新しい人間に生まれ変わったのです。新たに得た能力は、私に素晴らしい贈り物を与えてくれています。

I’m fortunate. I can type words far quicker than I can think and speak them – that part of my brain remains intact, thankfully. The part of my brain that controls written eloquence and imagination has remained, while I find it much harder to speak.

私は幸運です。考えたり話したりするよりもはるかに速く文字を入力できます。文字で雄弁に語る能力や想像力も維持されているようで、むしろ話す方が難しく感じます。

People with dementia can remember feelings. We never lose our emotions because they’re held in another part of this complex brain of ours. When you come to visit us, we might not remember what we did during the visit, but we’ll remember how we felt after you left.

私のケースですが、認知症の人は、感情を記憶できます。もしあなたが私たちを訪問したら、私たちは訪問中の出来事を思い出せないかもしれませんが、あなたが帰った後に何を感じたかはいつまでも覚えています。

One thing dementia has taught me is never give up on myself

認知症が教えてくれたことは、自分を諦めてはいけないということ

My daughters and I talk much more now than we used to. We discovered the importance of talking very early on post-diagnosis. After all, how do they know what I’m struggling with and how do I know what’s worrying them if we don’t talk? I’m still a mum and still want to help them, but I realise now that I’m more dependent on them. One thing I hope my book shows is how relationships change in a crisis, how new friends are made and how adapting to this new world is the key to surviving.

私は以前に比べて、娘たちとたくさん話すようになりました。なぜなら診断直後、私たちは話すことの大切さに気付いたからです。もし話をしなければ、私が何に苦しんでいるかをどのようにわかってもらえばいいのでしょう? 娘たちが何を心配しているかを、私はどのようにして知るのでしょう?

私は今でも母親であり、娘たちの助けになりたいと思っていますが、むしろ、私が娘たちに頼っているというのが現実です。私の本を読んだ人に伝えたいことの一つは、危機に直面したとき、他者との関係がどのように変化し、どのように新しい友人をつくり、新しい世界にどのように適応するかが危機を乗り切るための鍵を握るということです。

Technology used to be a mystery to me, but dementia has taught me to embrace its potential to help me cope with day-to-day living. I set reminders throughout the day to help me remember how to do the things I’d otherwise forget and they ding throughout the day. Whether I’m in the house or not, the message still appears on my phone and iPad. My daughters can now “track” me, so I’ll often get a text when I’m somewhere asking if I’m supposed to be there.

以前の私にとって、テクノロジーは謎の存在でした。けれども認知症のお陰で、テクノロジーの可能性を受け入れ、日常生活に対処できるようになりました。私は物事のやり方を忘れてしまうため、タブレットにリマインダーをいくつも設定しています。

自宅にいるときも、外出しているときも、携帯電話とタブレットにメッセージが表示されます。さらに、娘たちが私を「追跡」できるようになっています。私がどこかにいるとき、「そこにもともと行く予定だったのか」というテキストメッセージがしばしば届きます。

Throughout all of this – the symptoms, the diagnosis, having to create a new life for myself – I’ve learned that the type of diagnosis is irrelevant. It doesn’t even have to be a medical diagnosis like mine, it could be a divorce, a death, a birth. Every day we make decisions about the ways we live our lives, and that decision – be it small or large – can be the difference between what makes you and what breaks you when faced with the challenges that come our way.

発症、診断、そして新しい人生を過ごし、診断結果は私にとって重要ではないと学びました。それは、私が受けたような医学的な診断である必要すらありません。離婚や死、誕生でも同じです。私たちは日々、どのような人生を送るかという決断を下しています。そしてその決断は、大小に関わらず、目の前に難題が立ちはだかったときに自分が打ち勝てるか、それともくじけてしまうかの違いになる可能性があります。

I suppose the biggest thing dementia has taught me is to never give up on myself. Others may consider someone with dementia a “has been”, but we all had talents before diagnosis and we don’t lose them overnight. We simply need support from those around us to continue doing the things we love or to discover new talents within ourselves.

認知症が私に教えてくれた最も重要なことは、自分を諦めてはいけないということだと思います。認知症の人は「過去の人」と見なされているかもしれませんが、診断前には誰もが何らかの才能を持っていました。それが一夜にして失われることはありません。ただ、私たちが好きなことを続け、自分の中にある新しい才能を発見するには、周りにいる人たちからのサポートが必要というだけです。

What I’ve learned living with dementia is, don’t dwell on the losses and don’t dwell on the future as you have no control over either. Instead, grasp every opportunity that comes your way and most of all enjoy the moment, because in no time at all that moment will be the past.

私が認知症になって学んだことは、失ったものや未来について悩んでも仕方がないということです。どちらもコントロールできないからです。目の前に現れたすべてのチャンスをつかみ、何より今を楽しみましょう。なぜなら、「今」は一瞬で過去になってしまうからです。

This article was written by Wendy Mitchell from The Guardian and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

この記事は、The GuardianのWendy Mitchellによって書かれ、NewsCredパブリッシャーネットワークを通じて法的にライセンスされています。ライセンスに関する質問はすべて、legal@newscred.comにお送りください。

FEEDBACK

読むと、貯まるマガジン

イイね!ボタンを押したり、記事へコメントすることでマイルが付与されます。

EISAI MAGをご利用いただくと、メールやLINEなどでおすすめコンテンツなどをお届けすることがあります。

OK